Healthy Kids

Published on August 29th, 2018 | by Judith Fertig

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Build a Bento Box Lunch for kids

Pack Five Foods for Fun, Flavor and Health

by Judith Fertig

Old-style rectangular metal lunchboxes are passé. New, convenient compartmentalized containers inspired by the Japanese bento box and Indian tiffin allow parents to pack up to five different, colorful and healthy items for a child’s lunch with less plastic wrapping to separate foods. It dovetails exactly with what nutrition professionals recommend.

Think Five

“People usually eat with their eyes,” says Allison Forajter, a clinical dietitian at Community Hospital, in Munster, Indiana. “The more color and variety presented the better.”

Holley Grainger, a registered dietitian, creator of the blog Cleverful Living at HolleyGrainger.com and mother of two school-age daughters in Birmingham, Alabama, agrees, saying, “These boxes make lunchbox packing easier because each compartment can be assigned a different food group.”

Grainger usually starts with a protein, adds fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and inserts a surprise treat for a total of five selections. “One easy and inexpensive way to boost protein is through low-fat dairy options like milk, yogurt, string cheese or cottage cheese. For children that like meat and poultry, roasted chicken and low-sodium deli turkey are delicious options. This is where I like to work in leftovers, so last night’s entrée may be the filling for today’s lunchbox mini-tacos. For a high-protein vegetarian/vegan option, beans/legumes are a favorite, whether in dips, salsas, salads or pastas,” she says.

Forajter recommends exploring varied colors of the same type of fruits or vegetables. Offer green and purple grapes or red, yellow, green and orange bell pepper strips, and ask kids if each color tasted different. Including unusual fruits or vegetables can be a learning experience for the whole family. “Try purple and orange cauliflower or red, yellow, white or purple carrots,” she suggests.

Grainger not only packs healthy foods for her kids, she makes sure they get a little “emotional nutrition”, as well. She might include a piece of chocolate or a cookie, but the surprise doesn’t have to be food. “A note or picture from you written on your child’s napkin adds a special touch. It lets them know you’re thinking about them and gives them a feeling of security throughout the day,” she says.

Parents faced with the daily round of lunch packing may benefit from the system of five. Each item goes into a separate compartment in the bento, box-style lunchbox. Many also offer a space for a “chiller” to keep foods safely cool.

Easy Options

Protein: turkey breast, chicken breast, hardboiled egg cut in half, nuts, beans, almond butter, string cheese, yogurt.

Fruit: blueberries, apple slices, plums, grapes—something easy for kids to eat

Vegetable: carrots, English cucumbers, celery sticks, bell pepper strips—easy finger foods; kids might eat more veggies if provided with a dip such as hummus or natural homemade ranch dressing

Whole grain: ancient or whole grain crackers, pita bread, non-GMO blue corn chips

Treat: a happy surprise could be a piece of wrapped dark chocolate, a crayon or a funny, loving or encouraging note from a parent.

Lunch: a Key Meal

“When children are fueled with nutritious foods, they are more alert and focused throughout the day, leading to better behavior, concentration and test scores,” says Grainger. “They also have the opportunity to fill up on many of the essential vitamins and minerals often lacking in away-from-home meals. I’ve found that my children are hungrier at lunch than at other meals, so they tend to fill up on whatever is being offered.”

 

 Judith Fertig writes award-winning cookbooks plus foodie fiction from Overland Park, KS (JudithFertig.com).

Image: Elena Veselova/Shutterstock.com


About the Author

Award-winning cookbook author Judith Fertig, of Overland Park, KS, is a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings and blogs at AlfrescoFood AndLifestyle.blogspot.com..


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